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If you are female, expressing hatred for your own body is not just acceptable, it’s practically de rigeur. Failure to indulge in the requisite amount of self-flagellation – my thighs! my skin! my face! – isn’t just negligent, it’s unfeminine. Self-hatred is fundamental to how femininity is constructed, more fundamental than any of the more obvious external symbols (dress, make-up, shoes). What matters is not that you are beautiful, but you know your place in the beauty hierarchy (and since every woman ages, every woman’s place will eventually be somewhere at the bottom).

Young women are encouraged to bond over their dislike of excess body hair, surplus flesh and “uneven” skin. They are meant to do so in a jovial way, egged on by perky adverts informing them what “real women” do: worry about having underarms beautiful enough for a sleeveless top, celebrate curves with apologetic booty shakes and cackle ruefully over miserable Sex-and-the-City-style lunches of Ryvita and Dulcolax. It’s a gendered ritual; men get football and booze, women get control pants and detoxes. We are supposed, of course, to be grateful. Hey, you don’t have to be perfect! Just know you’re not perfect and act accordingly, with the appropriate levels of guilt and shame!

Fairy tale after fairy tale tells us that what matters is being beautiful “on the inside” but what does that really mean? It means submission, obedience and the suppression of one’s own desires. Don’t be haughty and proud. Clean the hearth. Kiss the frog. Love the beast. Suck it up when you’re replaced by a younger model. Sure, you may look fine, but you mustn’t feel fine. You mustn’t be vain. You mustn’t be angry. All fury and pain must be turned back on itself. That way you’ll be a real princess: silent, fragile and never threatening to challenge the status quo.


— Glosswatch, Almost Famous, real women, and the normalisation of self-hate. (via nextyearsgirl)

(Source: nextyearsgirlisaghostnow, via isthishardcore)

newyorker:

Ian Crouch on the planned return of “Twin Peaks”:

“When people say they want a third season of ‘Twin Peaks,’ they really mean that they want there to have been a third season, in 1992.”
Xu Bing (徐冰)

motel-chronicler:

I’ve got five four three two one
I’ve got a red pair of high heels on

(Source: morgiecorgi)

vicemag:

We Got Our ‘Twin Peaks’ Revival, Now What?
After years of neglect, a new generation of fans discovered the seminal drama series—which has lead to a third season being greenlit by Showtime after 25 years. Are we forever cursed to be given everything we want until the end of time?
Nearly every statement Kawakubo makes about herself is hedged or negated by a contradiction, and she resists being defined even by her own words. The desire to be unique and the sense of isolation that the feeling generates are a predicament common to artistic people. What makes Kawakubo’s clothes so attractive to them is precisely her genius for wrapping up the paradoxes of being a misfit and a cipher in something to wear that is magically misfitting.
Judith Thurman writes in a 2005 Profile of the Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

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